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Green Honda - Oil Tracking

posted Jul 8, 2017, 7:07 AM by Quoc-Anh Vuong

July 8th, 2017: Added 2 quarts of oil

2002 Honda CEL

posted Jul 30, 2016, 8:05 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong

Following codes:
  • P1259: Vtec System Malfunction
  • P0420: Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1)
  • P0301: Cylinder #1 Misfire
  • P0128: Coolant Thermostat (Coolant Temperature Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature)
  • P1738: second clutch pressure switch
  • P1739: Problem in 3rd Clutch Pressure Switch Circuit
  • P0740: Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Malfunction
  • P0730: Incorrect Gear Ratio
Half of the codes is pointing to the transmission!

Sienna Catalytic Converter Bank 1 issue

posted Jul 29, 2016, 9:00 AM by Quoc-Anh Vuong

Today, while driving to have the car ready for Emission Control Tests, the CEL lit up with the code P0420. 
We addressed the P0430 by replacing the A/F sensor, and the catalytic converter of bank 2; now the bank 1 needs attention

Van's engine temp sensor

posted Jul 21, 2016, 4:29 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong

We replaced the van's engine temp sensor today, hope that will fix the P0128 code.

Truck throws CEL

posted Jul 12, 2016, 7:41 AM by Quoc-Anh Vuong   [ updated Aug 1, 2016, 2:14 PM ]

The CEL has been on for a long time, and today following the codes were read
  • P0153 - This involves the oxygen sensor upstream the catalytic converter on Bank 2.
  • P0401 EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor EGR (DPFE). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc. The P0401 code means that OBD detected an insufficient amount of EGR.
  • P1151 This particular DTC article refers to a P1151 trouble code on Ford vehicles. This does not apply to other makes of vehicles. A Heated Exhaust Oxygen (HO2S) sensor indicating lean at the end of a test is trying to correct for an over-rich condition. The test fails when the fuel control system no longer detects switching for a calibrated amount of time
  • P0308 A P0308 code means that the the car's computer has detected that one of the engine's cylinders is not firing properly. In this case it's cylinder #8.

I think it's time to replace the O2 sensor, clean the throttle body, and give this truck a good tune-up.

After reading the instructions on how to replace the spark-plugs, and also the class action law suits which Ford agreed to pay, I feel a bit dreadful on this attempt.
Another article on how to replace the spark-plugs, and another!

Today,

  • P1151
  • P0300 - Random Misfire
  • P0171 - System Too Lean (Bank 1)
  • P0401

Sienna Van - Preparation

posted Jul 9, 2016, 2:05 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong   [ updated Jul 12, 2016, 2:12 PM ]

In preparation for the upcoming driving trips using the 2004 Sienna van, we replaced the both rear struts, cabin filter, air filter, and also cleaned the throttle body really well. We also clean the inside and cleared the CEL. The code we read out of the CEL are followed: P0128, P0300, P0304, P0306 and P0430. We plan to have the van tuned up before the trip, so the only one which trouble me a bit is the P0430. However, we cleaned the throttle body and replaced the air filter, so we hope that takes care of this code. The P0430 is:

Basically this means that the oxygen sensor downstream of the catalytic converter on bank 2 is detecting that the converter is not working as efficiently as it should be (according to specs). It is part of the vehicle emissions system.

This is the sensor for bank 2, upstream sensor 1: Denso 234-9042 Air Fuel Ratio Sensor

1991 Honda Civic

posted Aug 13, 2015, 3:56 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong

The car needs jumped after engine off for about 30min, and we found out that it's shorted on the brake light. Next day, after work, we inspected the brake switch/pedal and found out that it's missing the rubber cap, which presses on the switch when the brake  pedal is up. This causes the brake lights to be on all the time, even when the engine is turned off. The brake pedal stop is like this.

Order it here


Additional CEL for the truck

posted Aug 13, 2015, 3:49 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong   [ updated Aug 13, 2015, 4:01 PM ]

Truck's CEL

posted Jun 28, 2014, 1:16 PM by Quoc-Anh Vuong   [ updated Jun 28, 2014, 1:18 PM ]

The truck CEL is on, and the code is P0401, here is the code description

Took it from this link

P0401 OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Insufficient EGR Flow What does that mean? EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor EGR (DPFE). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc. The P0401 code means that OBD detected an insufficient amount of EGR. Symptoms You may notice drivability problems such as pinging (a.k.a. pre-ignition knock) when the engine is under load or the vehicle is at higher speeds. There may also be other symptoms. Causes A code P0401 most likely means one or more of the following has happened: The DPFE (differential pressure feedback EGR) sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced There is a blockage in the EGR (tube), most likely carbon buildup The EGR valve is faulty The EGR valve may not be opening due to a lack of vaccuum Possible Solutions In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. The EGR valve is not always the culprit. Use a vacuum pump and pull the EGR valve open while monitoring engine RPM's & DPFE voltage. There should be a noticable difference in RPM's with the EGR open Clean out the EGR valve and/or tubing to remove deposits Check the voltage at the DPFE, compare to specified values (refer to a repair manual for your specific model) Replace the DPFE sensor (with a good quality / OEM one) Replace the EGR valve

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0401
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor EGR (DPFE). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc. The P0401 code means that OBD detected an insufficient amount of EGR. Symptoms You may notice drivability problems such as pinging (a.k.a. pre-ignition knock) when the engine is under load or the vehicle is at higher speeds. There may also be other symptoms. Causes A code P0401 most likely means one or more of the following has happened: The DPFE (differential pressure feedback EGR) sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced There is a blockage in the EGR (tube), most likely carbon buildup The EGR valve is faulty The EGR valve may not be opening due to a lack of vaccuum Possible Solutions In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. The EGR valve is not always the culprit. Use a vacuum pump and pull the EGR valve open while monitoring engine RPM's & DPFE voltage. There should be a noticable difference in RPM's with the EGR open Clean out the EGR valve and/or tubing to remove deposits Check the voltage at the DPFE, compare to specified values (refer to a repair manual for your specific model) Replace the DPFE sensor (with a good quality / OEM one) Replace the EGR valve

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0401
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Insufficient EGR Flow

Our emissions expert has put together the following information about the P0401 fault code. We have also included diagnostic procedures you can take to your repair shop if the mechanic is having difficulty analyzing the code.

OBD II Fault Code

  • OBD II P0401

Fault Code Definition

  • Insufficient EGR Flow

Symptoms

  • Check Engine Light will illuminate
  • In most cases, there are no adverse conditions noticed by the driver
  • In some cases, there may be performance problems, such as pinging on acceleration, when the engine is under load or when driving the vehicle at higher speeds

Common Problems That Trigger the P0401 Code

  • Restriction in the EGR passages, usually caused by carbon buildup
  • Lack of a proper vacuum signal to the EGR Valve from EGR Vacuum Solenoid
  • EGR Vacuum Modulator is defective
  • EGR Temperature Sensor is defective
  • EGR Valve is defective

Watch This Video for an Understanding of the EGR System

The Basics
NOx gases are formed when the combustion temperature is too high (2500° F). EGR systems are used to reduce the combustion temperature, thus reducing NOx formation.

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system recycles a small amount of exhaust gas from the exhaust system (usually no more than 10 percent) and mixes it with the intake manifold air entering into the combustion chambers. The addition of this inert (or non-combustible) exhaust gas limits the peak combustion temperatures to a range that is below 2500° F, where the formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) is know to occur. In some cases where the engine is pinging and/or knocking badly from a severe lack of EGR flow, misfires can take place which allow raw hydrocarbons (HC) to be released from the tailpipe.

P0401 Diagnostic Theory for Shops and Technicians
When the computer sets a code P0401, it means that the EGR flow monitoring criteria has not been met. The EGR monitoring criteria are a set of test values and are usually run during at least two different driving conditions—steady speed freeway driving and steady speed city driving.

The engine control module determines proper EGR flow in many ways:


  • Measurable amount of Manifold Pressure change when the EGR is supposed to be flowing
  • Proper amount of change in the EGR Temperature Sensor
  • Measurable change (usually a decrease) in the front Oxygen Sensor Signal
  • Amount of Spark Knock as measured by the Knock Sensor

The code P0401 is often not a problem with the EGR valve itself. Rather, the EGR system is not allowing enough EGR to flow back into the combustion process to sufficiently cool the peak firing temperatures. Once the code P401 has been retrieved with a scan tool, the freeze frame data should be documented and analyzed in order to determine what engine conditions were present when the code was triggered. It is recommended that the vehicle be driven in such a way as to duplicate the code setting conditions with a data streaming scan tool connected, so the behavior of the EGR actuating components and feedback sensors can be monitored. Pay close attention to the DPFE readings and make sure that they are changing from a .5 to 1 range to a 3 to 4 voltage range when the EGR System is activated. Also, pay close attention to the EGR duty cycle that typically grows percentage-wise as the EGR Sytem is activated.

Common Tests to Determine Whether the Problem Is an EGR Control Problem, a Plugged or Restricted System, or a Defective Feedback Device

  • Does the engine die, not just stumble, when the EGR valve is manually raised to its maximum?
    (Use either a vacuum pump or bi-directional scan tool if it’s a digital EGR valve.)
  • Is the EGR valve getting sufficient vacuum? (Use the manufacturer EGR vacuum spec.)
  • Is the EGR system restricted? (The engine stumbles, but does not die.)
  • Is the EGR system plugged? (Engine RPM does not change.)
  • Does the EGR valve work?


  • Raise the RPM to 3000 and check manifold vacuum. Then open the EGR valve to its maximum—the manifold vacuum should drop by at least 3" of mercury. If it does not, there is a flow and/or restriction problem.
  • Test the Digital EGR Pressure Feedback Sensor (DPFE) with a data streaming scan tool to verify that the voltage or lift percentage changes according to spec.
  • Verify that the front Oxygen Sensor readings drop and the Short Term Fuel Trim increases when the EGR valve opens. (EGR leans out the mixture.)

Note
If the NOx goes down when the EGR valve is raised (this test is most commonly performed on a Dynamometer), it is likely that one or more EGR passages or cylinders are plugged or very restricted, making the EGR only go to one or two cylinders. When this occurs, you may notice misfires and even have misfire codes along with the P0401. This can occur on vehicles that use EGR "runners" for each cylinder.

EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor EGR (DPFE). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc. The P0401 code means that OBD detected an insufficient amount of EGR. Symptoms You may notice drivability problems such as pinging (a.k.a. pre-ignition knock) when the engine is under load or the vehicle is at higher speeds. There may also be other symptoms. Causes A code P0401 most likely means one or more of the following has happened: The DPFE (differential pressure feedback EGR) sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced There is a blockage in the EGR (tube), most likely carbon buildup The EGR valve is faulty The EGR valve may not be opening due to a lack of vaccuum Possible Solutions In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. The EGR valve is not always the culprit. Use a vacuum pump and pull the EGR valve open while monitoring engine RPM's & DPFE voltage. There should be a noticable difference in RPM's with the EGR open Clean out the EGR valve and/or tubing to remove deposits Check the voltage at the DPFE, compare to specified values (refer to a repair manual for your specific model) Replace the DPFE sensor (with a good quality / OEM one) Replace the EGR valve

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0401
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Father's Day Gift!

posted Jun 17, 2014, 10:02 AM by Quoc-Anh Vuong   [ updated Jun 17, 2014, 10:08 AM ]

It's a 1998 Ford F-150 truck. My dream truck. :)
Hương & the kids went to buy the truck. The seller did not give us any break, and demanded $2500 for the truck with a broken tailgate. Oh well, we will see how long this last, but for now it's pretty impressive: nice body, with camper, very minimal rust at this age, and the engine was rebuilt. It's a V8 Triton, supper cab, Lariat, and with towing option. I am very, very happy. Since the truck is big for the street parking, so I parked it on our driveway, and Hương was not too happy about that decision. :)

For the tailgate, I think it needs:
  1. Two cables, one on each side
  2. The hinge on the left side
  3. This tailgate was replaced the original one, and it has the F-250 emblem on it. One day, I will replace it with the correct F-150 emblem.
  4. It also missing the latch cover

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